Horney adult chat - Game dating wiki

Beginning with the day's biggest winner, and moving in order to the winner of the lowest prize value, the host would ask each contestant if they wanted to trade their winnings for a spot in the Big Deal (whose value was usually revealed at that point).

He would continue asking until two contestants agreed to participate.

The initial prize given to the contestant might also be concealed, such as in a box, wallet or purse, or the player might be initially given a box or curtain. Technically, contestants were supposed to bring something to trade in, but this rule was seldom enforced.

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On rare occasions, a contestant would appear to get zonked, but the zonk would be a cover-up for a legitimate prize; for instance, the old washer and dryer having a pair of old jeans that had thousands of dollars in cash or a set of keys to a new car in one of the pockets.

Though usually considered joke prizes, contestants legally won the zonks.

If all of Hall's offers were turned down and the grand prize lost, Hall would usually give the grocery items to the contestant as a consolation prize along with $50 or $100 in cash.

Played every few days, and announced with siren and quick-zoom fanfare, a contestant was chosen by a computer at random based on a number which now appeared on the contestant's tag (1 to 36).

Sometimes zonks were legitimate prizes but of a low value such as "Matchbox" cars, wheelbarrows, T-shirts, small food or non-food grocery prizes, etc.

Zonks are often demonstrated by the announcer, and legitimate prizes were modeled by the model (On the original series, Merrill would often help model the zonks).

Legitimate prizes ran the gamut of what was given away on game shows during the era (trips, fur coats, electronics, furniture, appliances, and cars).

Zonks were unwanted booby prizes which could be anything from animals (usually farm animals such as horses, cattle, donkeys, mules, pigs, ducks, geese, "A Bucket O'Chicken" which was real chicken in a coop that was shaped like a bucket, sheep, llamas, goats, and rabbits) to large amounts of food (cabbage, pumpkins, and bananas) to something outlandish like a giant article of clothing, a room full of junked furniture, an old washer-and-dryer, an old gas station, a moose head, the "World's Largest Crying Towel," or a junked car.

In addition, as the end credits of the show rolled, it was typical for Hall to ask random members of the studio audience to participate in fast deals.

In the current Wayne Brady version, these are often referred on the CBS version as "quickie deals", and are conducted by the host, announcer, and model each.

After that, there were limits placed on how much a trader could get.

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